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Posts Tagged ‘1917’

alexander_kerenskybWe all remember Kerensky from school, don’t we? He was the sandwich filler between Russia’s ancient Tsarist monarchy – overthrown early in 1917 – and the victory of the Bolsheviks in the so-called October Revolution (which occurred in early November). Alexander Kerensky (1881 – 1970), a lawyer by trade, was no less a revolutionary than Lenin et al but he differed – cruically – in his commitment to continued hostilities against Germany.

But when Russian soldiers deserted in their millions, the Kerensky regime collapsed and he went into exile early in 1918.

Remarkably, Kerensky outlived all his contemporaries by many decades, eventually dying in 1970. He had spent the intervening years mostly in France and the USA, where he was popular on the lecture circuit.

But even more bizarre than his longevity is that he came to be interred in Putney Vale Cemetery. For various reasons, the Russian Orthodox and Serbian Orthodox churches in New York refused to give Kerensky a funeral, so his remains wound up in Putney Vale – a non-denominational cemetery in south-west London.

Marking the centenary of the Russian revolution, a few of us visited Kerensky yesterday. His final resting place is modest.

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