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Posts Tagged ‘heritage’

Here are most of the events we held this year, with a picture for each. A couple – e.g. King’s Army Parade and Lord Mayor’s Show – are obviously not ours as such, but a contingent of Members always meets up at them to join in the celebrations.

In addition to those listed, we have a monthly pub meet-up every first Wednesday of the month (but 8th not 1st in January 2020). After many happy years at the Hoop & Grapes, Farringdon, we felt it time for a change and for most of 2019 we used the Bishop’s Finger in Smithfield. Note that all are welcome at this event, not just Members.
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I’d like to thank everyone who led tours or spoke at our talks evenings and all of the London institutions who generously hosted us and extended the best hospitality.

With over 600 Members, increasingly our events are becoming Members-only. At any rate, LH Members get cheaper (or sometimes free) tickets. If you like what you see below and would like to join us, please do so here.

Sunday 27 January
King’s Army Parade 2019.
Approximately 500 Royalist re-enactors commemorate the execution of Charles I on 30 January 1649, marching along the Mall to Horseguards.

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Monday 28 January
Tour and Visit of Stephens Ink Museum (Stephens House and Gardens). Led by LH Member Melanie Wynyard.

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Monday 18 March
Tour of Watermen’s Hall.

watermens

Thursday 28 March
Bazalgette 200 Tour
on the 200th anniverary of the birth of the great engineer. Led by LH Member Rob Smith. On this all day event we travelled from Putney in the west to Abbey Mills in the east, stopping at the Institute of Civil Engineers with a pub lunch in Covent Garden. We did him proud.
bazalgette

Monday 1 April
Fortnum & Mason archivist’s talk (and tea!).
by LH Member Andrea Tanner.
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Tuesday 30 April
History in the Pub: Theme of Animals in London
Full house of an evening of talks and quiz. Speakers included LH Members Joanna Moncrieff, Diane Burstein, Hannah Renier, Rebecca Preston, Rob Smith, Jane Young and Tom Almeroth-Williams, author of City of Beasts (our Book of the Year for 2019).
hitp_beasts

Friday 3 May
Tour of Accountants’ Hall.
led by LH Member Sharon Grant.
ca_hall

Saturday 18 May
George Orwell’s London.
Walking tour led by LH Member David Poyser.
orwell

Monday 20 May
Tours of Tower Bridge (x2)
to celebrate the 200th anniversary of architect Horace Jones.
towerbridge

Wednesday 29 May
London Historians Big Quiz 2019
Quizmaster LH Member Matt Brown. Winning team, 50 Shades for the second year.
big quiz

Tuesday 4 June
Brompton Cemetery Tour.
including the catacomb and refurbished chapel. Led by Robert Stephenson.
brompton cem

Tuesday 18 June
Holden Goes West
A tour of some of the great Tube architect’s stations on the western end of the Piccadilly Line. Led by London Historians members David Burnell and Steve Leppert.
All proceeds to London Transport Museum.
acton town tube

Tuesday 25 June
Tour of London Transport Museum art collection, Acton Depot.
Led by LH Member David Burnell. Poster shown here is by Man Ray.
All proceeds to London Transport Museum.
poster man ray

Wednesday 26 June.
History in the Pub: The London Book Trade.
Evening of talks by: Margaret Willes, Anthony Davis, Henry Eliot and Diane Burstein. MC Colin Davey. Quiz questions: Matt Brown.

Thursday 4 July.
Curator Tour of Dr Johnson’s House, with punch!
Led by LH Members Celine McDaid and research academic Prof Sheila Cavanagh.
dr johnson

Friday 5 July
Tours of Charlton House and Severndroog Castle.
charlton house 01
Severndroog Castle 06

Tuesday 9 July
Book Lovers’ St James.
Walking tour led by LH Member Anthony Davis.

Thursday 22 August
From Pilgrimage to Biscuits: Harlesden and Willesden.
walking tour and church visits led by LH Member Andrew Teather, Dean of Brent.
willesden-harlesden

Monday 26 August
Foundation Day Life Members’ Lunch.
Parcel Yard, King’s Cross Station.
lifers

Saturday 24 August
LH annual Ian Nairn birthday pub crawl.
nairn

Thursday 29 August
Tours of Wiltons Music Hall and Hoxton Hall.
London’s only two surviving music halls.
wiltons
hoxtonhall

Sunday 1 September
Awayday: Historic Croydon
Croydon Aerodrome followed by guided walk by LH Member Gavin Webb.
croydon01
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Thursday 5 September
London Historians Annual Lecture 2019
at Gresham College. Talk by Prof Arthur Burns from KCL.
arthurburns

Thursday 19 September
Tour of 55 Broadway
Our annual tour of Charles Holden’s 1929 masterpiece, formerly HQ of London Transport/TfL. Led by LH Members Edmund Bird and David Leboff. Proceeds to the Railway Children charity.
55 broadway

Tuesday 22 October
Novo Cemetery and Ragged School Museum.
cemetery bit led by LH Member Caroline Swan.

ragged school museum

Thursday 24 October
History in the Pub: More Favourite Londoners.
Eight speakers on eight Londoners of note. Talks from LH Members Laurence Scales, Rob Smith, Joanna Moncrieff, Daniella King, Jen Pedler, Robert Kingham, Diana Burstein, Marilyn Greene. MC and quizmaster: Matt Brown (pictured).
matt brown

Friday 25 October.
The Changing Face of Brentford.
Tour led by local historians Janet McNamara. We’ll do more London suburbs in 2020. Yes, I know Brentford’s a town, but you get my drift.
brentford

Friday 1 November.
Tour of BT Archives in Holborn.
Documents, objects and ephemera dating back to 1840.
bt archives

Wednesday 13 November.
History in the Pub: Four London Artists named William.
(Dobson, Hogarth, Blake, Turner). Our speakers: Waldemar Januczszak (pictured), Val Bott, Jon Newman, Catherine Parry-Wingfield. MC and quizmaster: Matt Brown.
hitp london artists

Thursday 14 November
Tour of Salters’ Hall and archive.
salters hall

Wednesday 27 November
Roger Williams Whitebait Supper.
at the Trafalgar Tavern, Greenwich. This was a celebration of the life of LH Member Roger Williams who died in August. He was a leading authority and author on the London and Thames historic whitebait industry. Proceeds to British Heart Foundation.
whitebait

Monday 2 December
Tour of Down Street Station.
Historic ‘ghost’ station, closed in the early 1930s. Used in WW2 as an underground HQ of the London Transport Executive and also a favourite bolt hole of Winston Churchill. Led by LH Member David Leboff.
down street

 

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This is an update from a post from June last year, but I think deserves a new one, such is the outrage of this case. Observe this lovely riverside image in Brentford, directly opposite Kew Gardens.

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It is the developer’s own picture of its redevelopment of the St George’s Chapel site, until relatively recently the home of the Musical Museum. Looks lovely, I’m sure you’ll agree. Look at the small white building with the red roof to the left. Let’s zoom in a bit.

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That building is – or was – the historic Sarah Trimmer’s School, dating from 1806. It is – or was – significant as the first and only remaining example of an industrial training school in this country, mainly for young women. Historically highly significant.

Here is all that is left of it as of Sunday.

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Only the west and south facing walls remain. They almost certainly will not survive. The developers – IDM Properties – have sneakily, deliberately and steadily destroyed the building while they got on with the chapel development next door.  Why? Because they can maximise their take by building three teensy bungalow apartments against all advice of local historians and council denial of their planning application for same. Hounslow Council gave them a bit of a slap on the wrist last year, but now seemingly have given up the candle.

The developers are greedy scumbags (show me one that isn’t). The Council are cowardly and lazy collaborators. If they could wash their hands of the hassle of protecting our heritage, they would. I live in this borough. I am ashamed of them.

I say again, delinquent developers must do jail time. I bet that’s in nobody’s manifesto!

 

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Firepower, the museum of artillery in Woolwich, closes its doors today for the last time. This is a tragedy. As a former gunner myself I am possibly biased, but in my opinion it was the best military museum in London with brilliant staff, brilliant volunteers and an outreach programme second-to-none.

The museum’s archive has already been shipped out, leaving military history researchers in the lurch. Now the guns, ammunition, displays, ordnance equipment, medals collection (including 22 VCs from the 62 awarded to gunners) will be crated up, transported and stored at the Royal Artillery HQ in Larkhill, to be seen again when – who knows?

I realise that there were – and are – challenging problems, mainly financial, relating to the museum, but I believe a better way forward could have been sought and found. Surely. The Regiment appears to have taken the easy way out and another strand of the thread connecting Woolwich with gunners has been severed. A “gunners gallery” is to be opened at the Greenwich Heritage Centre later this year apparently. Big deal.

I understand from speaking to various people that the ultimate decision to close the museum came from the Master Gunner, General Granville-Chapman.

Anyway, there you go. More heritage denied. I’ll pop into the museum for one last look today. I’d like to thanks all the staff and volunteers at Firepower for their enthusiasm and hospitality they’ve extended every time I’ve visited, an experience shared by many thousands down the years. Good luck with all future endeavours. Ubique!

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The Shocking Case of Sarah Trimmer School, Brentford.

THE SARAH TRIMMER SCHOOL Instituted in the year 1786 For Religious Instruction and Industry Supported by annual Subscriptions and Benefactions and the produce of the Children's work

THE CHURCH SCHOOL
Instituted in the year 1786
For Religious Instruction and Industry
Supported by annual Subscriptions
and Benefactions
and the produce of the Children’s work

This sign adorns the street-side wall of 367 Brentford High Street, widely known as Mrs Trimmer’s School Room. Built in 1806, it is Grade II listed and historically highly significant. First, as recent research by historians James Wisdom and Val Bott has made clear, it is probably the only surviving example of a Georgian industrial school. Second, its association with its founder, Mrs Sarah Trimmer, a well-known educationalist of the time. It survived in its primary role – and also as a Sunday School – deep into the 19th Century, long after its founder’s death. Hence the building’s importance and heritage is unquestionable and something of which Brentfordians can rightly feel proud.

This view is not shared by the developers IDM West London Limited.

These developers who – to the consternation of many locals – have caused severe damage to the fabric of the building over the past two months, violently removing chimneys and roof and causing cracks to at least two of the main walls. Following the unauthorised removal of the roof, a Hounslow enforcement officer ordered them to protect the building with a cover and to cease further work. It was only after several downfalls that the cover was installed, a good 10 days later. Late last week and in breach of the order, the builders on site sand blasted the paint from two of the outside walls, forcing the council to intervene again on 9 June, this time with a Temporary Stop Order. The problem is that breaking the order can result in a maximum fine of only £20,000, hardly a deterrent to a rapacious developer.

Chimneys violently ripped out.

Chimneys violently ripped out.

Severe cracks have appeared.

Severe cracks have appeared in two of the walls.

The roof, apart from existing damage by the developers, in generally good shape.

The roof, apart from existing damage by the developers, in generally good shape.

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The roof: gone!

Having been told to suspend work on the building, the developers sandblasted two of the walls in a way you probably won't see in any English Heritage manual.

Having been told to suspend work on the building, the developers have sandblasted two of the walls in a process you probably won’t see recommended in any English Heritage manual.

A horrible extra side effect of the roof destruction is the loss of an interesting structure in the beams which was probably a flue of some sort – long disused – from an earlier incarnation of the roof. There can’t be many examples around – but now it’s gone. (see pictures below)

The truth of the matter is that the workers on this site have been attacking this poor old building like a troop of drunken chimpanzees with jackhammers. As a lay person it’s difficult to say, but it wouldn’t surprise me to learn that the structural integrity of this building has been compromised as a result of its violent treatment.

The interior of the building in January 2016. Note the rectangular frame in the beams.

The interior of the building in January 2016. Note the rectangular frame in the beams.

Detail.

Detail.

Some weeks ago, I contacted IDM West London to see if they could adequately explain their actions. To be fair, their Project Architect, Bal Heer, returned my call, chatted at length and sent me quite a detailed email of what they had done and why. Subsequent events have caused me to revisit it and this leapt off the page:

“2nd week of May the main contractor commenced temporary support of the chimney structure as recommended by the Structural Engineer. It is clear to see the extent of the chimney leaning into the roof in the photo below: Leaning chimney. During this propping process the large double chimney became unstable and had to be removed from the existing roof. Further investigation showed the extent of the damage to the roof structure and the decision was taken to remove as much of the load from the damaged roof structure, ie the tiles were removed carefully so they could be used again.”

Aha! Did they tell the council or seek advice? Of course not. This is the old oh-dear-what-a-shame routine beloved of developers when they wish to justify wrecking something inconvenient to themselves. It was used by another outfit very recently less than a mile up the road to smash down the frontage of some Victorian terraced houses (that’s a whole other story).

Sadly this case is by no means unique. But it typifies what developers get up to and, most of the time, what they get away with. Their sole ambition is to build ’em high and sell ’em high. They will milk the last penny from every square inch of a site, regardless of the consequences for our heritage or for local people. If an opportunity arose, say, to smash down the Cenotaph itself and put up a unit of “luxury apartments” called The Warrior Quarter, believe me there isn’t a developer in London who wouldn’t do it.

I am not a Nimby. We have to build new things and replace old things. But developers want it all. How do we stop this desecration of our heritage? As in this case, it’s vital that local people especially, and Londoners generally, continue to be vigilant and kick up a fuss immediately when they see or suspect heritage vandalism by developers. But more importantly – because they are able actually to do something – local authorities must intervene with maximum and swift vigour. Westminster Council did exactly this recently when a developer smashed down the Carlton Tavern in Maida Vale, a viable and thriving pub.

Well done them. All councils have a duty of care for their local heritage. I’d like for my council – London Borough of Hounslow – to build a fearsome, rottweiler reputation against developers who swan in here and smash up the fabric of our historic structures. Play by the rules and you’re very welcome. Do not, and you’re in big, big trouble. I’m hoping for more from them in this case. Let’s see how they go.

To repeat: if IDM West London contravenes the stop order, the maximum potential fine is £20K. Puny. This isn’t going to slow down any developer whose massively profitable project is held up by pesky council officers. More sanction need to be made available against law-breaking developers, and that must be jailtime. Go to Jail. Go Directly To Jail. Do Not Pass Go. Do Not Collect 20 million. That’ll learn them to have some respect.

The perps.

The perps.


More images on our Flickr space, here.

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I was taking a stroll down to Brentford High Road yesterday and noticed that the old cop shop is for sale: it’s been closed for years. A typically charmless 60s commercial building, purpose-built for the boys in blue, it replaced the rather fetching Vestry Hall of 1900. The hall was designed by local architect Nowell Parr, many of whose pretty buildings (mainly Fullers pubs!) still decorate Brentford, Ealing and Chiswick. The old hall could host meetings and talks of over 600 attendees and also housed Brentford County Court. But in 1963, the bulldozers and wrecking-ball moved in. Progress!

I hope to do more on Nowell Parr in the near future. Meantime, enquiries regarding the lovely police station should be directed to Messrs Frank Knight.

 

nowell parr, vestry hall

Weep.

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Last November, outdoor advertising giant JCDecaux applied to Hounslow Council to change the famous Lucozade sign next to the M4 flyover in Brentford. They wished to switch the animated neon sign for a modern technology giant LCD screen, the type which has become commonplace on major trunk roads in recent years. The content was to remain Lucozade.

Locals (including me) got wind of this very late and there was outrage that the beloved sign was in danger. But on 31 January, the council turned down the application to sighs of relief all round. I announced this on Twitter which evinced a huge and positive response, and not just from Brentfordians. The sign is widely loved, it seems. Read more here. Not very good film clip by me on YouTube, here.

The current sign is, in fact, a 2010 replica of the original 1954 version which was on a building about 250 yards east of the current site. The first sign is stored in Gunnersbury Park Museum (worth visiting). Lucozade was a locally manufactured product along with other household names such as Mcleans toothpaste and Brylcreem. That remained the situation despite various mergers and takeovers over the late 20th century resulting finally in the pharmaceutical giant GSK. GSK offloaded the Lucozade brand to Japanese company Suntory last year, giving rise to the current Lucozade sign brouhaha.

I think this affair raises a lot of questions. First, if the owners of Lucozade decided they no longer wanted to pay for advertising, would it be okay for them to get free publicity on the massively busy M4 flyover? Furthermore, who would then pay for the electricity and maintenance of the sign? JC Decaux? Hounslow Council? English Heritage? I don’t think so.

There is a precedent, of sorts. Back in sixties, Ferodo – makers of brakes and related accessories – decided that their medium of choice was to be railway bridges and the deal was done, presumably with British Rail at that time. Of course, when the deal came to an end, clever Ferodo got many years of free advertising. Last year, the one on the Caledonian Road got painted over but I saw another one still proudly with us in Bow. There must be others.

Ferodo advert

Caledonian Road. Half done. “Ferally”

Ferodo Advert

Bow Road.

Of course, there are key differences. Ferodo brake pads are less personal products than Lucozade and crucially, the Ferodo signs are ubiquitous whereas the Lucozade sign is a one-off and has strong local connections. For the moment.

But what else is going on here? This is pure speculation on my part. Suntory have picked up Lucozade, and with it the Brentford sign, which like it or not, they’re obliged to keep going. What to do? Change the sign for a modern one while committing to keeping the advertisement exclusively Lucozade as a sop to local and motorway traveler sentiment while fulfilling the heritage brief. Then, it’s the easiest thing in the world to change to other advertisers later because with a modern sign, the heritage argument has actually been lethally undermined.

Suntory and JC Decaux will be back. In the end, I think they will win. For some of the above reasons, I believe we must reluctantly accept that the sign will eventually go, there are much more deserving things to fight for around London. Equally as worthy in my opinion, but I didn’t hear anyone complaining (except me!) when we lost the lovely Christmas trees on the old Beecham building after Barratt Homes took it over.

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Many were up in arms last week when English Heritage announced that, apart from existing commitments, it would be suspending its blue plaque activities. It was reluctantly taking this step, we learned, because of the severe cut in its grant from Westminster. It had “stood down” its advisory team, comprising Stephen Fry, Andrew Motion and Bonnie Greer (yes, I wondered too!). Much gnashing and wailing of teeth ensued in the press (kicked off by the Guardian, who got its sums completely wrong. Bless), and also on Twitter and Facebook. You’d have thought that all the EH blue plaques were to be torn off the very walls they adorned.

I don’t think we should be overly concerned.

First, it could be argued that we have too many plaques on our streetscape already. If it pleases your worship, I offer you this:

Blue Plaques English Heritage

Further comment superfluous. But in case you’re in thrall to the miracles of Homeopathy, it’s very near South Kensington tube station.

Second, English Heritage don’t have a monopoly on memorial plaques. Just some of the organisations which have put up plaques over the years include London County Council, Greater London Council, Dead Comics Society, City of Westminster, Mayor of London, Hayes Literary Society, The Corporation of the City of London, National Art Collections Fund, Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charities Foundation, London Borough of Southwark, John and Ruth Howard Charitable Trust. And on and on. What’s more, attractive as the EH plaques are, some of the others are equally and indeed more so. And in a variety of shapes, colours, sizes. We need variety, and London does higgledy-piggledy rather well.

London Plaques

I’m particularly fond of this world-weary item, provenance apparently unknown.

London Plaques

Third, if we have to have new plaques, it doesn’t have to be English Heritage who takes care of matters. Its ugly sister, the National Trust, is apparently willing to step into the breach. Furthermore, subject to listing, ownership and possibly by-laws I’m not aware of, you can do your own plaques if you have a mind to. Just last summer, the Historic Kilburn Plaque Scheme, led by Ed Fordham (LH Member) put up a plaque to George Orwell.

Finally, I’d like to point out that I’m a fan of English Heritage, in fact I’m a very recent joiner. They run their properties well and have delightful staff. I can see that George Osborne’s Big Cut will give them a nasty headache. But we don’t really need new English Heritage blue plaques particularly urgently one way or another in my view; I suspect they have used this suspension as much as a publicity stunt as anything, and rather successfully, so it would seem. We needn’t get our knickers in a twist.

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